The Consequences of Violating Probation

The Consequences of Violating Probation

When an individual is charged with a crime and is found to be guilty, he or she may be sentenced to probation for a period determined by the sentencing judge. Typically, probation is granted in lieu of prison. It is usually granted to individuals who commit petty crimes and are not threats to the well-being and safety of their fellow citizens. Probation may also be the result of entering a plea bargain. In most cases, there are a number of restrictions that come with probation, many of which may be unique to the case.

Usually, though, there are standard rules by which individuals on probation must live. These terms are usually non-negotiable and often are rules that individuals not on probation must follow to avoid criminal convictions. Generally, these terms include:

Staying out of further criminal trouble

Passing random drug and alcohol tests

Regularly visiting a probation officer

Additionally, individuals usually are not allowed to possess firearms or other weapons while under probation. Breaking the terms of probation may carry several consequences, usually depending on which terms are broken and what effect those broken terms have.

Regardless of which terms an individual breaks, he or she will be required to attend a hearing before a judge. After hearing the individual’s reason for violating the terms of his or her probation, the judge may extend the length of the individual’s probation period or sentence the individual to prison.

Individuals who violate their terms the first time may be more likely to just receive an extension. Individuals who violate their terms more than once may be more likely to be sentenced to prison. It is important to note that an individual who is sentenced to prison will not have to complete his or her probation term after being released.

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