How A Violent Crime Attorney Can Help Resolve Cases Before They Are Brought To Court

How A Violent Crime Attorney Can Help Resolve Cases Before They Are Brought To Court

Not everyone who has been accused of violent crime is guilty of committing it. Many times, individuals have been thrust into court trials with little justified reason. It is the job of a violent crime attorney to ensure that their clients are treated with more respect and discretion.

A competent, trustworthy criminal law attorney can help an accused individual fight his case even before it goes to court. Court trials can be incredibly messy, not to mention convoluted, time-consuming, and detrimental to one’s reputation. Clients can save themselves from the stress and social stigma if their defense lawyer can help them prove the soundness of their defense early on. This can be done through pre-file investigation.

Pre-file investigation is the stage wherein the criminal defense attorney represents the client in an early stage of the criminal process, before formal charges are actually filed by the prosecutor. During this stage, the violent crime attorney can utilize a variety of resources to gain information and evidence to support his client’s defense. The defense lawyer may look up on police investigations, direct public records searches, or consult with psychological experts, polygraph testers, forensic investigators, computer or Internet experts and other authorities.

The main objective is to prevent the criminal complaint from being filed and brought to court. There are two ways to achieve this: the defense attorney can either bolster his client’s credibility or discredit the victim’s accusation. The client’s credibility can be backed up by disclosing favorable private polygraph results or by presenting reference letters from trustworthy parties such as community leaders, religious leaders, teachers or friends. Defense lawyers may also attack the complaint credibility of the victim by uncovering unsubstantiated allegations against others made by the victim or by introducing witnesses to question the reputation and truth of the victim’s accusation.

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